Schelling's Segregation Model in Julia - Part 1

This article is the first of a series that introduces the Julia programming language by replicating Schelling, Thomas C. “Dynamic models of segregation.” Journal of mathematical sociology 1.2 (1971): 143-186. Follow along by cloning the git repository over here: https://github.com/timlrx/learning-julia Why Julia? From the creator’s themselves: We are greedy: we want more. We want a language that’s open source, with a liberal license. We want the speed of C with the dynamism of Ruby. [Read More]

Benchmark of popular graph/network packages v2

This is an update of a benchmark of popular graph / network packages post. This study aims to serve as a starting point for anyone interested in applied graph or network analysis. The featured network packages offer a convenient and standardised API for modelling data as graphs and extracting network related insights. Some common use cases include finding the shortest path between entities or calculating a measure of centrality such as the page rank score. [Read More]

Serverless Machine Learning with R on Cloud Run

One of the main challenges that every data scientist face is model deployment. Unless you are one of the lucky few who has loads of data engineers to help you deploy a model, it’s really an issue in enterprise projects. I am not even implying that the model needs to be production ready but even a seemingly basic issue of making the model and insights accessible to business users is more of a hassle then it needs to be. [Read More]

Speeding up R Plotly web apps - R x Javascript part I

Back to blogging! Sorry for the long hiatus, had some personal projects which kept me really occupied over the past few months. Hope to share about them one of these days and potentially even explore open sourcing parts of them but the idea of this post is to transfer some of my learnings over the past year to an issue in R that always irritated me - slow loading webapps. [Read More]

Benchmark of popular graph/network packages

This post is superseded by an updated benchmark In this post I benchmark the performance of 5 popular graph/network packages. This was inspired by two questions I had: Recently, I have been working with large networks (millions of vertices and edges) and often wonder what is the best currently available package/tool that would scale well and handle large scale network analysis tasks. Having tried out a few (networkx in Python and igraph in R) but on different problems, I thought it would be nice to have a head to head comparison. [Read More]

Binance hackathon - 2nd place solution

Technical overview of the solution and my hackathon experience

It has been about a month since my team and I placed 2nd in a hackathon organised by Binance. Since it was my first time officially doing front-end development, I thought it would be fun to blog about my experience in the hackathon and document the technical solution which I coded up in react.js. A massive congratulations to the three winning teams of the #Binance #SAFU Hackathon who shared a prize of \(100,000 USD worth of <a href="https://twitter. [Read More]

Cleaning openstreetmap intersections in python

Introduction It has been a while since I have posted anything on Python, so I thought it is time to switch things up and write do a Python GIS tutorial. GIS in python typically revolves around the geopandas and shapely packages. If you are using OpenStreetMaps(osm) in your work, the osmnx package is also very useful and makes downloading and visualising map data straightforward. In this post, I explore the problem of simplifying route intersections. [Read More]

An Overview of the Singapore Hiring Landscape

The idea of having a 360 degree view of the entire job seeking and matching landscape has always been a dream of any labour economist. Just imagine, a dataset of CVs and job seekers matched with job advertisements and openings! The potential of such a dataset to answer existing questions on the labour market is incredible. One could investigate market power between worker and firms, information asymmetry within the matching process, or find out new growth clusters and skills needed to support these areas. [Read More]

Visualising Networks in ASOIAF - Part II

This is the second post of a character network analysis of George R. R. Martin’s A Song Of Ice and Fire (ASOIAF) series as well as my first submission to the R Bloggers community. A warm welcome to all readers out there! In my first post, I touched on the Tidygraph package to manipulate dataframes and ggraph for network visualisation as well as some tricks to fix the position of nodes when ploting multiple graphs containing the same node set and labeling based on polar coordinates. [Read More]